You have requested to unsubscribe from the Printer@Work e-mail newsletter. Please enter your e-mail address below and click the Unsubscribe button. You will immediately be removed from the Printer@Work e-mail list.

E-mail Address
We’re sorry to see you go… we hope to see you again soon!

Please take a few moments to enjoy the most recent issue of Printer@Work below before you
Return to wholeearthinc.com.

Whole Earth Inc. August 9, 2006


An adroit mixture of everyday settings and extraordinary events.
Click to view...


The world of business and finance gets skewered, as Bottom Liners tackles subjects such as foreign takeovers, office policies, getting a raise, and the fast-paced world of Wall Street.
Click to view...


A wry look at the absurdities of everyday life.
Click to view...


In today's complex world of family issues, Focus on the Family provides grounded, practical advice for those dealing with family problems.
Click to view...


A whimsical, slice-of-life view into life's fool-hardy moments.
Click to view...







Idea of
the Week





Basic design principles still apply.
Idea of the Week
The Secret of Good Forms

There are those who are bored to tears by the thought of designing a form and those who love the fussy challenge of creating a good, clear, usable document. Forms are seriously underrated in the world of graphic design.
Of the four basic design principles (contrast, repetition, alignment, and proximity), the secret to a good-looking form is alignment. Lack of alignment is the single biggest failure that makes a form appear unclear to the user. The other principles are also very important, as in any design, particularly contrast to help direct the user through the form, proximity to keep groups of related pieces of information together, and repetition to tie it all together. But alignment is the key.

The top example uses interesting typefaces and calls out the major features in bold for clarity in communication and visual contrast and repetition, but it doesn't look as clean and clear as it could.

In the lower example, elements are aligned, which naturally presents a cleaner look. Cleaner (usually) communicates better. Also, the spacing was adjusted so that the elements that belong together (like those two lines of "suggested donations") are closer together, and the separate elements have a wee bit of extra space between them (following the principle of proximity).


See more great ideas like this!
Click here to visit the Whole Earth Inc. Ideas Collection.

   Send this article to a friend